Asperger Syndrome, Adolescence, and Identity: Looking Beyond by Harvey Molloy

By Harvey Molloy

How do youngsters with Asperger Syndrome view themselves and their very own lives? This e-book is predicated on wide interviews with teenagers clinically determined with AS. It comprises six lifestyles tales, as unique from scientific case experiences, written in collaboration with the kids themselves. those current an real and engaging examine the lives of the teens and the way AS has formed their growing to be identities. The tales give you the foundation for a dialogue of universal issues and matters dealing with youngsters with AS. Asperger Syndrome, early life and id additionally questions the medicalized deficit method of Asperger Syndrome and discusses the social repercussions of labelling young ones as having AS.

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Asperger Syndrome, Adolescence, and Identity: Looking Beyond the Label

How do youngsters with Asperger Syndrome view themselves and their very own lives? This e-book relies on wide interviews with children clinically determined with AS. It contains six lifestyles tales, as specified from scientific case reports, written in collaboration with the teens themselves. those current an genuine and interesting examine the lives of the kids and the way AS has formed their growing to be identities.

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I saw the diagnosis essentially in terms of the benefits it could provide me, such as access to a good school where everyone could understand me and I could do my best. I never saw it as a ‘label’ in the negative sense of the word. After the diagnosis I was able to get a place in a state secondary school about 20 miles away from home that had a Chinnor Resource Unit attached to it. The unit was right on the school campus. It was fairly large, about 10 or 15 of us with Asperger’s and maybe 20 with more severe forms of autism.

One of Rachel’s defining characteristics is her intelligence. She joined Mensa when she was about 11. Helen is also a member of Mensa and describes how Rachel came to join: Rachel started to play the online kids’ Mensa games and she just adored them. She played with them morning, noon, and night and did absolutely brilliantly at them. So we applied for a test pack and she did that and did really well. Her IQ was 152 the last time it was measured. The motivation to join Mensa was to have Rachel’s intelligence recognized.

I also thought that if I did happen to run into any difficulties at university at least I’d have some sort of valid explanation. ’ But really in terms of the academic stuff, or even the social stuff, I don’t need the label at all. I think it would just complicate matters, especially in the forming of social relationships, if I went around telling people. Friends and girlfriends During childhood I had one close friend. It started as an arranged friendship. My mother knew someone through the church who had a son starting at the Convent school at the same time as me.

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