Conceptions of Space and Place in Strategic Spatial Planning by Simin Davoudi, Ian Strange

By Simin Davoudi, Ian Strange

Bringing jointly authors from academia and perform, this booklet examines spatial making plans at diverse locations in the course of the British Isles. Six illustrative case reports of perform study which conceptions of area and position were articulated, offered and visualized throughout the construction of spatial strategies. Ranging from a wide conurbation (London) to neighborhood (Yorkshire and Humber) and nationwide degrees, the case reports supply a rounded and down to earth view of the actual effects and the idea at the back of them. whereas there's frequent aid for re-orienting making plans in the direction of house and position, there was little universal knowing approximately what constitutes ‘spatial planning’, and what conceptions of area and position underpin it. This book addresses those questions and stimulates debate and important puzzling over house and position between educational planners.

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Page_46 Page 47 These spatio-institutional rivalries are an important strand in Welsh regional planning. The terms in which they were played out revealed the continuing significance of the positivist legacy especially in its interpretation of scale, spatial organisation and time. Spatial hierarchies, towns and cities and their hinterlands, movement corridors and distance decay were among the key planning notions. And in their temporal dimensions, planning discussions and documentation into the 1990s privileged the economic rhythms of the British, and later global, economy.

And in their temporal dimensions, planning discussions and documentation into the 1990s privileged the economic rhythms of the British, and later global, economy. The economic and social relations associated with industrialisation in Wales from the eighteenth century onwards have tended to create and accentuate differences, and hence the potential for rivalry, within the country. Different economic, social and cultural spaces and networks (most extending far outside the country) continue to co-exist, overlap and interact.

Furthermore, one of the key tenets of post-modernism is its insistence on the death of the grand narrative practices of modernity and its turn to post-structuralist theory in its critique of modernist forms of discourse and narrative (Allmendinger 1998, 2000). This has obvious implications for planning, characterised as it is as a product of modernity. According to Beauregard (1996:192), ‘the text of a postmodern planner, in fact, should be consciously fragmented and contingent, non linear, without aspiration to comprehensiveness, singularity or even compelling authority’.

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